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EXPLORE THE MOST OF THE ETERNAL CITY

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The Best Destinations

Essential Vatican Tour
From
€ 55,00
Per person
Musei Vaticani, Cappella Sistina, Basilica di San Pietro
3 hs.
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41 REVIEWS
The most beloved place to visit in Rome, our complete Vatican tour includes – the Vatican Museums, Sistine Chapel, and St. Peter’s Basilica. All of the must-see destinations when visiting Vatican City.

And you can skip the line with our Priority Access, allowing you more time to enjoy your Vatican visit.
Best of Rome in a day - W
From
€ 51,00
Per person
Colosseo, Fori Imperiali, Piazza Venezia, Fontana di Trevi, Pantheon, Piazza Navona
3.5 hs.
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10 REVIEWS
Explore the top places to visit in Rome. Our Eternal City sightseeing tour takes you to the must-see destinations: the Colosseum, Ancient Forum, Trevi Fountain, the Pantheon and Piazza Navona.

And you can skip the line with our Priority Access – allowing you more time to enjoy Rome.
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20 %

OFFER
Round-Trip Shuttle bus se
From
€ 90,00
€ 72,00
Per person
Pompei
12 hs.
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9 REVIEWS
Our round-trip shuttle bus service from Rome is the perfect way to visit Pompeii.

Travel comfortably on this ideal day trip from Rome and have the freedom to make your own Pompeii tour itinerary- without having to worry about transportation.

You will have 4 hours of sightseeing all to yourself to enjoy the ruins of this ancient and legendary city. One of the most traveled destinations in Italy , with the best-preserved site of excavated ruins- Pompeii is both haunting and fascinating.

Explore this lost civilization and wander around the ancestral maze of streets independently - or take advantage of one of our guided Pompeii tours when you upgrade.
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5 %

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The Best of Ancient Rome
From
€ 51,00
€ 48,45
Per person
Colosseo, Fori Imperiali, Campidoglio
3 hs.
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6 REVIEWS
Explore one of the most remarkable places to visit in Rome – the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. Our expert guide will take you on an historical sightseeing tour through the vast archaeological site where in 735 B.C., Ancient Rome was born. And you can skip the line with our Priority Access - allowing you more time to enjoy Rome.

For a truly memorable experience that is wait-free and hassle-free, you will relive history as our guides bring the stories of this lost civilization back to life. Our Colosseum tour is the perfect way to see Rome in a day.
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5 %

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Essential Rome Sightseein
From
€ 59,00
€ 56,05
Per person
Basilica di San Pietro, Castel Sant'Angelo, Piazza Navona, Pantheon, Campo de' Fiori
3 hs.
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Our expert guide accompanies you on this sightseeing walking tour to the most beautiful and picturesque sites and squares of the city. Essential to your visit to Rome. The tour begins with a visit to St. Peter’s Basilica and continues to the fortress of Castel Sant’Angelo, crossing the majestic Sant’Angelo Bridge. We explore the historical center via the magnificent fountains in Piazza Navona before reaching the Pantheon, finishing our walk with a traditional Italian aperitivo in one of the most fascinating areas of Rome- Campo de’ Fiori - a square loved by locals and bursting with cafés, street artists and live music.
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18 %

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Enchanting Day Trip from
From
€ 110,00
€ 90,20
Per person
Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Villa d'Este
7 hs.
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6 REVIEWS
This enchanting day trip from Rome takes you to Tivoli where you will explore two unique locations: Hadrian’s Villa and Villa d’Este.

Our expert guide takes you through these undiscovered wonders, delving into the fascinating past of Emperor Hadrian’s Villa and the majestic Renaissance- built Villa d’Este with its enchanting gardens rich with a magnificent system of fountains. Both destinations truly deserve their UNESCO world heritage site status.

This bus and walking sightseeing tour is the perfect off-the-beaten path excursion outside of the bustling city – and the best way to see one of the most beautiful places to visit in Rome.
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Because we work solely with licensed guides from the City Council of Rome - with degrees in Archaeology, History of Arts and PhDs – Enjoy Rome has some of the best tour guides around.
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With 25 Years of Experience
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Our expert guides take you to the must-see destinations as well as the undiscovered places to visit when in Rome.
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Enjoy Rome Blog
Like a Local: Aperitivo
21 Nov 2016
While walking through the streets of Rome, you may see a variety of bars offering what is commonly referred to as aperitivo. But what does it mean? In this article we hope to share this distinctly Italian practice with you, as well as give you some of our recommendations for the best aperitivo in the city. What is Aperitivo?  (cc: pinkpangea.com) The word "aperitivo" comes from the latin word "aperire" - meaning to open and stimulate the appetite.  Although the practice can be traced to the northern regions of Italy, today aperitivo is served across the country and is seen as being an important part of socialization in Italian culture. (cc: pata.it) Although aperitivo may be different depending on where you go, it can be simplified in one fundamental concept: a drink paired with small snacks that is meant to open the appetite and kickstart digestion before dinner. Some locations keep it simple with small snacks such as olives, mixed nuts and potato chips; while others offer a full buffet of pastas, sandwiches, cheeses, etc. It is also becoming more common to find aperitivo featuring international dishes like chicken curry and cous cous. You will usually find aperitivo being served between 18:00 - 21:00 and range from 5€ to 15€.  Traditionally, an aperitivo drink is made with a bitter liquor such as Campari or Aperol. Aperitivo in Rome: The Spritz  (cc: lifeinitaly.com) Although there are a few drinks that are traditionally served with aperitivo, the Spritz is probably the most popular in Rome.  The Spritz can be traced back to the Venice region in the 1800s when soldiers of the Austrian Empire asked for their wine to have a small amount of water sprayed into it to make it lights.  In the 1900s carbonated water was substituted for still.  Later, bitter liquors (such as Campari or Aperol) were added. 5 Aperitivo Spots in Rome  1. Gusto al 28 (cc: gusto.it) Gusto al 28 is  wine bar located near Piazza Popolo, just off of Via del Corso.  In addition to their industrial-chic decor, they offer an extensive wine list and cocktail menu.  Their aperitivo is excellent - including pastas, pizza, and a variety of fried snacks. Where: Piazza Augusto Imperatore, 28 (Via del Corso) Price: around 10€ 2. Salotto 42 (cc: zero.eu) Nestled in the perfect central location, Salotto 42 offers artisinal cocktails and a generous aperitivo buffet.  You can also sip you cocktail while enjoying the view of Hadrian's temple. Salotto 42 is also located close to the Pantheon, making it the perfect stop after our walking tour of Rome at night. Where: Piazza di Petra, 42 Price: around 10€ 3. Fluid (cc: fodors.com) This ultra-modern cocktail bar is one of the the best aperitivo bars in the city. Despite its, well, interesting decor Fluid is known for its extensive selection of liquors and cocktails.  In addition to their drink selection, Fluid has a huge aperitivo that features both Italian and international options.  It is also located just down the street from Piazza Navona - perfect for a post Ancient Tour aperitivo! Where: Via del Governo Vecchio, 46 Price: 10€ - 15€ 4. Freni e Frizione (cc: spottedbylocals.com) This trendy bar is located in one of Rome's trendiest neighbourhoods - Trastevere. With expert mixologists manning the bar, its no surprise that Freni e Frizione is one of the best places to go for a cocktail.  They also feature an aperitivo bar in the evenings with pizza, pastas, and salads as well as an outdoor terrace between Piazza Trilussa and the Tiber. Check out aperitivo at Frene and Frizione after our walking tour of Trastevere and the Jewish Ghetto. If you want to learn more about Trastevere, head over to our previous post where we explore the area and give you our highlights.  Where: Via del Politeama, 4/6 Price: around 10€ 5. Panella (cc: prontoroma.com) Although their cocktails may be a bit pricey, you don't want to miss out on Panella's aperitivo.  They offer a wide selection of gourmet breads, fried foods, bruschette, crostini, and more.  Located in the trendy Monti district, Panella is also the perfect place to go for a stroll and a bite to eat near the Colosseum. Where: Via Merulana, 54 Price: 15€-20€ Where is your favourite place to go for aperitivo in Rome? Let us know in the comments!
The Holy Year of Mercy and the Holy Doors of Rome
19 Nov 2016
What is Jubilee/the Holy Year?  (cc: giubileopapafrancesco.it) The practice of celebrating the Holy Year has ancient roots and can be traced back to the book of Leviticus in the Old Testament.  The year-long celebration normally occurs every 25 years and feature special events, pilgrimages, and sacraments centered around the forgiveness of God, but the Pope also has the ability to proclaim extraordinary Holy Year if he so chooses.  During each Jubilee, the Holy Doors are opened and those who pass through are said to be absolved of all previous sin. The first Holy Year or Jubilee occurred in 1300 after many - who had been experienced war and immense suffering - flocked to the tombs of St. Peter and St. Paul. Since then, there have been  27 Holy Years including 3 that were extraordinary.  Extraordinary Jubilees (such as this year) are not previously planned and are called on by the Pope in order to emphasize a particular theme or event.  For example, the last extraordinary Jubilee was held in 1983 under Pope John Paul II to mark the 1950th anniversary of Jesus' death. What is the Holy Year of Mercy?  - (cc: giubileopapafrancesco.it) Pope Francis declared that December 8th 2015 - November 20th 2016 would be the 27th Holy Year and that it would focus on the concept of mercy.  According to interviews given by the Pope, this was done is response to "the world's need for a revolution of tenderness".  In other words, the Pope aimed to highlight the suffering, marginalization, and poverty that has permeated society in recent years and connect the suffering with those dedicated to providing support.  The Pope declared the official theme of the 2015 Jubilee would be "Merciful Like the Father". Why are the Holy Doors Significant?  Holy Doors are significant in the Catholic church as they are only opened during Jubilee years.  Each Holy Door is an entrance to a major Papal basilica and they are normally sealed from the inside using brick or cement. As previously mentioned, during Holy Years people are able to walk through these doors and receive what is said to be absolute forgiveness for their past sins.   The most prominent Holy Door is located at St. Peter's Basilica, however there are 3 other Holy Doors located in Papal basilicas in Rome - St. John Laternan's, St. Mary Major's, and St. Paul's Outside the Walls. - There are also many other doors that have been given this status all over the world.  Check out this interactive map to see where they are located.  Jubilee 2016: The Holy Year of Mercy Pope Francis' Holy Year of Mercy will officially come to an end this Sunday when the Holy Doors at St. Peter's Basilica are closed and resealed.  The pontiff's Jubilee of Mercy including a variety of events that aimed to highlight "works of mercy" such as feeding the hungry, visiting the sick, sheltering the homeless, etc.  It is estimated that over 20 million people made the pilgrimage to Rome over the course of the year to walk through the Holy Doors and St. Peter's. It is also estimated that over 1 billion people participated in the Year of Mercy worldwide. Here are some of the highlights: (cc: yahoo.com/news) Pope Francis unofficially began this year's Jubilee by opening the Holy Doors at a cathedral in the Central Republic of Africa The Holy Year of Mercy officially commenced on the morning of December 8th, 2015 when the Pope opened the Holy Doors at St. Peter's Basilica. (cc: telegraph.co.uk) Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home also took place on December 8th and featured images of our "shared natural world" being projected onto St. Peter's.  The aim of the event was to inspire change regarding the current climate crisis across generations, cultures, languages, etc. (cc: telegraph.co.uk) The Holy Doors at St. John Lateran's were opened on December 13th, 2015. The doors at St. Mary Major followed on the 1st of January, as well as the doors at St. Paul's Outside the Walls on January 26th, 2017. (cc: dailymail.co.uk) Over the course of the Holy Year of Mercy, the Pope including various events dedicated to prisoners, the homeless, and disabled persons.  For example, closing events have including Pope Francis inviting prisoners and homeless persons into St. Peter's Basilica for Holy Mass. What was your favourite event of Jubilee 2016? Let us know in the comments!  The Holy Doors may be closing tomorrow morning, however you can still experience St. Peter's Basilica with Enjoy Rome.  Click here to book!                  
November 19th - 24th in Rome
17 Nov 2016
The month of November is flying by! Here are 5 things to add to your calendar this week: 1. Rome Jazz Festival  (cc: romajazzfestival.it) Rome's 40th jazz festival continues this week through the 23rd of November.  Performances this week include Fabrizio Consoli, Paola Ronci, Jacky Terrason Trio, and many more.  Head over to the festival's website for more details. More information: romajazzfestival.it 2. Life of Wine (cc: @mohawkvalleywinery) On Sunday November 20th, Rome will be hosting an interesting wine tasting opportunity.  Organized by Florence's Studio Umami, the event seeks to highlight the relationship between wine and time by featuring vintage selections.  The event includes over 60 wineries, guided tastings and panel discussions. When: November 20th, 11:30-19:30 Where: Hotel Radisson Blu Roma, Via Filippo Turati 171 Entrance: 20€ 3. Monti Unplugged: Emily Jane White  (cc: thisismyjam.com) On November 21st, Emily Jane White will be performing as part of the Monti Unplugged acoustic concert series! The California native will be playing at Blackmarket in one of Rome's coolest neighbourhoods. When: November 21st, 21:00 Where: Blackmarket, Via Panisperna 101 Entrance: Free 4. Arnoldo Foa Exhibit (cc: arnoldofoa.it) Rome's Teatro di Villa Torlonia is holding an interesting event dedicated to an Italian film icon.  Until December 30th, visitors have the chance to see a variety of photographs, film clips and personal items that showcase the life and career of Arnoldo Foa.  Foa is considered to be a staple in Italian film as he appeared in over 130 movies between 1938 and 2014. When: Until December 30th Where: Teatro di Villa Torlonia, Via Lazzaro Spallanzani 1A Entrance: Free 5. International Festival of Sacred Music and Art  (cc: linkedin.com) The International Festical of Sacred Music and Art will be in Rome until November 21st.  The festival features a variety of events that you don't want to miss including performances by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. When: Until November 21st More information: http://www.festivalmusicaeartesacra.net/en/programm.php
Explore With Us: Navona
16 Nov 2016
The city of Rome is made up of various neighbourhoods/districts that each have their own sentiments and atmospheres.  Twice a month, Enjoy Rome will be exploring these neighbourhoods and providing you with our tips to make the most out of your visit.  This week we are exploring the Navona neighbourhood; one of Rome’s most historic areas.  Book your spot on our guided tour of Ancient Rome to learn more! The area surrounding Piazza Navona is commonly referred to as the Navona neighbourhood, but it is technically part of the Parione district.  Parione is the 6th district (or rione) of Rome and refers to much of the historic centre.  The large neighbourhood was actually split into two sections when Corso Vittorio Emmanuele was constructed in the late 19th century - a northern section surrounding Piazza Navona and a southern section surrounding Campo de' Fiori.  If you want to read more about Campo de' Fiori, check out last week's Mercato Monday post.  You can also book your tour of Campo de' Fiori by clicking here. Here are our Navona highlights, as well as recommedations of what to see/do before or after your Ancient tour: TO SEE:  No visit to to this area is complete without going to the piazza that is at the heart of the district - Piazza Navona.  The piazza was actually built on top of Domitian's stadium from Ancient times! Although you can no longer visit the stadium itself, it is fascinating to imagine while standing amongst the Baroque palazzi, ornate fountains, and colourful street art that has come to define the square.  Piazza Navona is the final stop on our Ancient tour. At the centre of the square is one of Bernini's most famous masterpieces, the Fountain of Four Rivers, that is said to personify the four major rivers - Nile, Ganges, Danube, and Plate). Also located inside the square is Chiesa Sant'Agnese in Agone.  The baroque-style church was built in the 17th century on the site where Saint Agnes was said to be martyred. Just next to the church you will also find Palazzo Pamphilj.  The palace was built by Pope Innocent X, but today is houses the Brazilian embassy. Find interest in the supernatural? Piazza Navona is actually said to be haunted! Legend has it that the ghost of Costanza Conti de Cupis (a noblewoman from the 1600s) can be seen in the windows looking down on the piazza, but only when there is a full moon. Just outside Piazza Navona you can also find Museo di Roma - which was founded during the fascist era in order to preserve "old Rome".  Today, it is largely a museum of art that is part of Rome's network of civic museums. Not far from Piazza Navona you will find Piazza Pasquino.  The piazza itself has a lot to offer including a beautiful church and great restaurants.  However, the most interesting part of this small piazza is is the statue that is referred to as one of Rome's "talking statues".  The statues have been used for centuries as a means for political expression and anonymous civil disobediance. Even today you can see poetry and other forms of political commentary posted next to the statue. Chiesa Nuova (also known as Chiesa Santa Maria in Valicella) is located just a short walk from the Piazza along Corso Vittorio Emmanuele and features incredible frescos.  It was built in 1577 and also has an impressive library inside. TO WALK:  Via Governo Vecchio is one of the areas main streets.  Grab a gelato and  to admire the cobblestone streets, boutique shops, and renaissance era homes. Via Coronari and Via della Pace are also worth a stroll. TO SHOP: Piazza Navona has no shortage of places nearby to sharp, but the most noteworthy are the vintage and leather shops along Via Governo Vecchio. During the day (as well as sometimes at night)  you can also find a variety of artists and craft vendors in the actual piazza, as well as the surrounding area. TO EAT:  The Navona neighbourhood has a ton to offer in terms of restaurants and the winding streets are home to many authentic italian restaurants.  Cul de Sac in Piazza Pasquino offers a large selection of wine and locally curated meat/cheese plates.  Pizzeria Baffetto is the place to go for pizza and eating in this family-run establishment is an experience in and of itself.  On the other side of Piazza Navona you can also find The Old Bear, whose pasta menu changes daily to ensure the freshest ingrediants. TO DRINK:  In addition to everything else it has to offer, this neighbourhood is also known for its nightlife.  Whether inside the piazza itself or on one of the many sidestreets, there are a variety of places to get a quality cocktail and people-watch.  We recommend Bar del Fico; they have an artisanal cocktail menu, aperitivo and even live music.  Mimi & Coco and Il Piccolo offer the perfect people-watching locations. If you are looking for your sports fix, Via Governo Vecchio is also home to an Irish pub called The Abbey.  Want to learn more about this historic neighbourhood? Book your tour of Ancient Rome and experience it with a live guide! What's your favourite part about the Navona neighbourhood? Let us know in the comments!   
Mercato Mondays: Campo de' Fiori
14 Nov 2016
Situated in the heart of the historic centre, Campo de’Fiori is one of the most vibrant squares in Rome.  The name Campo de’ Fiori translates to “field of flowers” and dates back to the middle ages when the square was simply a meadow.  In the mid 15th century however, Pope Callixtus III decided to develop the area.  This led to the construction of numerous important structures such as Palazzo Corsini. As a result, Campo de’Fiori became a popular gathering place for the neighbourhood’s powerful.  Since then, Campo de’ Fiori has cultivated a rich and fascinating history – most recently, the piazza has become one of Rome’s most important markets.  Join us as we explore Mercato Campo de’ Fiori and share  some of our highlights with you. Where: Piazza Campo de’ Fiori When: Monday – Saturday, 7:00-14:00 (Note: during high tourist season the market also opens on Sundays) Want to learn more about the history of Campo de’Fiori? Book your spot on our Trastevere tour to experience Campo de’Fiori with a live guide!  The market in Campo de’ Fiori is one of the oldest open-air markets in Rome. Each morning, the piazza is transformed into a colourful local marketplace that is enjoyed by both residents and tourists. Despite the large number of tourists that flock here each day, the market has been able to retain many of its traditional characteristics – thus providing a window into everyday Roman life.   From fresh seasonal fruits/vegetables, to spices, to pastas, to kitchenware, to  even clothing – Campo de’ Fiori offers an incredible range of products in a quintessentially Roman setting. Here are some of our highlights: Just like the piazza's name would suggest, Campo de' Fiori is one of the many places in Rome where you can get fresh flowers. Here you can find a variety of indoor/outdoor plants, as well as seeds to plant yourself. One of the best things about Campo is the fresh fruit stands.  If you are looking for a healthy breakfast or snack on the go, look no further. Here vendors offer bowls of freshly chopped fruit, as well as fresh-squeezed fruit juices.   Seasonal produce is also in abundance in Campo de' Fiori.  Each vendor offers locally grown produce - some of which is even pre-chopped.  You know soup season has arrived when the Minestrone mix (pre-chopped vegetables for soup) is front and centre. The market also offers a variety of housewares - we recommend checking out the wide range of ceramics. Some vendors specialize in artisinal meats and cheeses. While others specialize in Italian leathers. Although it may not be part of the actual market, Forno Campo de' Fiori has become a staple in the piazza.  The bakery offers some of the best pizza bianca in the city! Ever wonder who the statue in the centre of the piazza is of? Head over the Halloween edition of Enjoy Rome's blog to read about Campo de' Fiori's dark past.  Click here to book your tour of Campo de' Fiori!
November 12th - 18th in Rome
12 Nov 2016
This week in Rome... 1. Saturdays at Capitoline Museum (cc: secretearth.com) From November 12th to December 3rd, visitors have the chance to experience the Capitoline Museum in an entirely different light.  The musem itself is one of the oldest in Rome dating back to the 15th century. Each Saturday, the museums will be open late from 20:00 to 23:00.  Each Saturday evening will feature different events including live music, theatrical performances, food, art displays and many more. When: November 12th, 19th, and 26th as well at December 3rd - 20:00 to 23:00 Where: Musei Capitolini - Piazza del Campidoglio, 1 Tickets:  only €1 2. This Week at Rome's Jazz Fest (cc: romajazzfestival.it) Rome's 40th Jazz Festival continues throughout the city this week.  Now that the festival is in full swing, there are an abundance of performances and events in the next week. Performances this week include Richard Galliano, Crazy Stompin' Club, John Scofield, and many more. Check out the festival's website for more details. More infomation: http://www.romajazzfestival.it/ 3. All Blacks Versus Italy ù (cc: federugby.it) New Zealand's All Blacks rugby teams returns to Rome this week.  The legendary team will face off against Italy at Stadio Olimpico this Saturday! When: November 12th - 15:00 Where: Stadio Olimpico - Viale dei Gladiatori Tickets:  Prices vary depending on where they are purchased 4. Reaction Roma Exhibit (cc: wantedinrome.com) This exhibit definetly provides visitors with an interesting perspective of Roman life.  Made from over 400 video entries, Reaction Roma captures life in the city through the lens of everyday Romans. The exhibit has been referred to as "photograph in motion" that depicts the "real Rome". When: November 11th to December 3rd - 14:30 to 19:30 Where: MACRO Testaccio - Piazza Orazio Giustiniani, 4 Tickets:  Free entry 5. Other Times, Other Myths Exhibit From now until January 8th, visitors have the chance to experience the 16th edition of Quadriennale d'Arte di Rome.  The exhibition celebrates contemporary Italian art and features 150 works by 100 artists including paintings, sculptures, and photography. In particular, this year's exhibition will focus on how Italian contemporary art has developed since 2000. When: Until January 8th - 10:00-20:00 daily, closed on Mondays Where: Palazzo delle Esposizioni - Via Nazionale, 194 Tickets:  8€-10€
National Unity and Armed Forces Day
04 Nov 2016
Wonder why there were jets flying over the centre this morning? Or why Piazza Venezia was closed to traffic? National Unity and Armed Forces Day On November 4th, Italy celebrates National Unity and Armed Forces Day - which commemorates the end of World War I on the Italian Front and soldiers lost in battle.  The day is also meant to pay respect to those actively serving in Italy's armed forces around the world. On November 3rd 1918, Italian and Austrian-Hungarian forces agreed to and signed an armstice agreement at Villa Giusti in Padova, Italy.  On November 4th, 1918 the ceasefire between Italian and Austrian-Hungarian forces took effect - ending the First World War on the Italian Front and contributing to the conclusion of the war shortly there after. (cc:difesa.it) The ceasefire was the result of the Battle of Vittorio Veneto in northern Italy where Italian forces defeated Austrian-Hungarian forces.  Some Italians see this victory as the cumination of the Risorgimento Nationalist Movement that unified the country in the 19th century. (cc:difesa.it) National Unity and Armed Forces Day at Altare della Patria in Rome Each year, Rome commemorates National Unity and Armed Forces Day with a ceremony at Altare della Patria. During the ceremony more than 1000 service members participate in the military parade. The ceremony also features the President of Italy placing a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. There is a fly-over by the Italian Air Force's aerial acrobatics team Frecce Tricolori. (cc:difess.it)
November 4th - 11th in Rome
03 Nov 2016
1. Roma Jazz Festival (cc: romajazzfestival.it) From November 6th to the 23rd, Rome will be holding its 40th annual jazz festival! The festival includes various events and performances to be enjoyed by the public.  This week You can see Radical Gypsy at Casa del Jazz (November 6th), Joshua Redman/Brad Mehldau Duo at Sinopoli Hall (November 8th), and Jacob Collier at Petrassi Hall (November 9th). Where: Locations vary, please visit website When: November 6th to 23rd, specific times vary Tickets: Also varies based on performance 2. Exhibit: Star Wars: Play (cc: ilvittoriano.com) Until January 29th, visitors have the opportunity to experience the cinematographic history of the Star Wars francise right here in Rome.  The exhibit includes over 1000 items including scale models, toys, costumes, vintage prints and many more. Experience another level of the universe that has captivated audiences for decades. Where: Complesse del Vittoriano ala Brasini, Via San Pietro in Carcere When: Until January 29th - Monday to Thursday 9:30-19:30, Friday and Saturday 9:30 to 22:00, and Sundays 9:30-20:30 Tickets: 8€ - 10€ 3. Cinema2Day (cc: @cinema2day) Thanks to the Italian Culture Ministry, it will only cost 2€ to see a movie next Wednesday! The nationwide initiative hopes to encourage culture through the cinema and applies to over 3000 movie theatres nationwide. The initiative will also continue through the second week of February, offering 2€ movies on the second Wednesday of each month. Where: Locations vary, please go to the Cinema2Day website for more details When: November 9th Tickets: 2€ 4. Exhibit: Art and Politics (cc: museomacro.org) "Arte e Politica" is MACRO's newest exhibition exploring differenct political and social themes.  From 1930s paintings reflecting sentiments surrounding Fascism to more recent social/political attitudes and issues, this exhibit is both thought-provoking and fascinating.  The exhibit includes works by Mario Mafai, Claudio Abate, Ines Fontenla, and many more. Where: MACRO, Via Nizza 138 When: Until May 10th - Tuesday to Sunday 10:30-19:30 Tickets: 9€-11€ 5. MAXXI Raises Funds to Help With Earthquake Aftermath  (cc: @valentina_pascale) Following a series of earthquakes in central Italy, the MAXXI Museum of 21st Century Art has decided to raise funds to help restore historic buildings, churches and other aspects of Italian cultural heritage that were damaged.  On Saturday November 5th, all proceeds from ticket sales at MAXXI will go directly towards these efforts.  This is a great opportunity to experience one of Rome's best museums while also giving back to the community! Where: MAXXI, Via Guido Reni 4 When: Saturday November 5th - 11:00-22:00 Tickets: 8€-12€ What are your favourite events in Rome this week? Let us know on Facebook!  Visit our website to book one of our many guided tours of Rome! 
Explore With Us: Trastevere
02 Nov 2016
The city of Rome is made up of various neighbourhoods/districts that each have their own sentiments and atmospheres.  Twice a month, Enjoy Rome will be exploring these neighbourhoods and providing you with our tips to make the most out of your visit.  This week we are wandering through the charming streets of Trastevere, one of Rome's most interesting districts.  Book your spot on our guided tour of Trastevere and the Jewish Ghetto to learn more! The Trastevere neighbourhood, the 13th district of Rome, is an off-the-beaten-path gem that is rich in history and culture.   Trastevere (which means "across the river") is a unique district filled with winding cobblestone streets, greenery and even graffiti.  You can find this charming area on the West side of the Tiber River via Ponte Sisto, just a short walk from the busy city centre. The origins of Trastevere can be traced to Ancient Rome when it was mostly inhabited by sailors, fishermen, and slaves. It also became home to the city's first Jewish community before the Ghetto was established in the 1500s. Fast forward to the 1970s, the culture of Trastevere is comparable to the 1960s counter-culture in San Francisco - attracting writers, acitivists, and musicians en masse. It is clear that Trastevere was considered to be on the periphery for centuries, however it is this position that allowed it to develop the unique personality that is tanglible in the district today. Here are our Trastevere highlights, as well as recommendations of what to see/do before or after your tour: TO SEE... Although Piazza Trilussa is located at the edge of the district, it remains one of Trastevere's main squares.  Here you will find both locals and tourists sitting on the steps of the fountain, enjoying a beer and listening to live music. On the weekend, Trilussa becomes a hotspot for Rome's youth before they head to one of Trastevere's many bars. Porta Settimiana is an ancient gate in Rome's Aurelian walls.  In Trastevere, you can sip a cappuccino at the nearby cafe while observing this piece of antiquity. (cc: maremagnum.com) Head to Trastevere's main square - Piazza Santa Maria - to see Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere.  The piazza itself is often bustling with visitors and street artists including musicians, performers, etc.  You will also find it is a common past-time to sit and people watch on the steps of the fountain.  The Basilica itself dates back to the 4th century and includes incredible 12th century mosaics.  Experience Basilica di Santa Maria in detail on our guided tour of Trastevere and the Jewish Ghetto!  Basilica di Santa Cecilia (the patroness of music) is also located in the Trastevere district. The church itself was built in the 9th century and is said to have been constructed on the site where St. Cecilia's home once stood. Inside you will find one of Cavalini's most famous frescoes, as well as Stefano Maderno's sculpture of St. Cecilia. The church was built during the reign of Pope Paschal I who also had St. Cecilia's remains moved there from the San Callisto Catacombs. Book your tour of the San Callisto Catacombs to see St. Cecilia's orginial resting place. You can also find Palazzo Corsini in the Trastevere district - an 18th century boroque palace built by the prominent Corsini family. The palace now holds the National Gallery of Antique Art. Also worth mentioning is Piazza San Cosimato.  Each Sunday morning, the Piazza holds Trastevere's only open-air market. TO WALK... As previously mentioned, Trastevere has some of the most charming streets in the city. Many of the district's cobblestone streets are lush with greenery and romantically lit at night.  Enjoy Rome recommends Via del Moro and Via dei Genovesi. Just above Trastevere is Gianicolo Hill where you can find some of the best views of the Eternal city.  It is about a 20 minute walk up-hill, but so worth it. TO SHOP... One of the best things about Trastevere is that it has some of the most interesting shopping in the city. Here you will find a variety of flagship/concept stores and studios with an ecclectic selection of items.  It's a "you won't find this anywhere else" kinda place. We recommend the Almost Corner Bookstore for a wide selection of international literature and Polvere di Tempo for a magical mix of globes, clocks, etc.  Also be sure to stop into Ferrara for artisanal italian food products. TO EAT... Trastevere has emerged as one of Rome's most prominent foodie neighbourhoods.  Whether it is traditional italian dishes, international cuisine, or street food, Trastevere has it all.  We recommend Dar Poeta - a quaint family-run pizzeria tucked away on a quiet street.  La Renella is the place to go for pizza al taglio (Roman pizza by the slice), fresh breads, and baked desserts.  Additionally, Checco has built a reputation for having some of the best Roman cuisine in the district.  If you are looking to satisy a gelato craving Fior di Luna's selection of fruit flavours are some of the best. TO DRINK... Trastevere is central to Rome's nightlife.  On the weekends (as well as many weekdays) you will find the streets street buzzing with local youth and international students.  As a result, the neighbourhood has cultivated an interesting variety of cocktail bars.  We recommend Freni & Frizioni if you are looking to mingle with the locals and Santo if you are looking to try top notch mixology. Bir and Fud also offers a wide selection of Italian brewed beers. Want to see more? Book your tour of Trastevere with Enjoy Rome! 
Like a Local: Aperitivo
21 Nov 2016
While walking through the streets of Rome, you may see a variety of bars offering what is commonly referred to as aperitivo. But what does it mean? In this article we hope to share this distinctly Italian practice with you, as well as give you some of our recommendations for the best aperitivo in the city. What is Aperitivo?  (cc: pinkpangea.com) The word "aperitivo" comes from the latin word "aperire" - meaning to open and stimulate the appetite.  Although the practice can be traced to the northern regions of Italy, today aperitivo is served across the country and is seen as being an important part of socialization in Italian culture. (cc: pata.it) Although aperitivo may be different depending on where you go, it can be simplified in one fundamental concept: a drink paired with small snacks that is meant to open the appetite and kickstart digestion before dinner. Some locations keep it simple with small snacks such as olives, mixed nuts and potato chips; while others offer a full buffet of pastas, sandwiches, cheeses, etc. It is also becoming more common to find aperitivo featuring international dishes like chicken curry and cous cous. You will usually find aperitivo being served between 18:00 - 21:00 and range from 5€ to 15€.  Traditionally, an aperitivo drink is made with a bitter liquor such as Campari or Aperol. Aperitivo in Rome: The Spritz  (cc: lifeinitaly.com) Although there are a few drinks that are traditionally served with aperitivo, the Spritz is probably the most popular in Rome.  The Spritz can be traced back to the Venice region in the 1800s when soldiers of the Austrian Empire asked for their wine to have a small amount of water sprayed into it to make it lights.  In the 1900s carbonated water was substituted for still.  Later, bitter liquors (such as Campari or Aperol) were added. 5 Aperitivo Spots in Rome  1. Gusto al 28 (cc: gusto.it) Gusto al 28 is  wine bar located near Piazza Popolo, just off of Via del Corso.  In addition to their industrial-chic decor, they offer an extensive wine list and cocktail menu.  Their aperitivo is excellent - including pastas, pizza, and a variety of fried snacks. Where: Piazza Augusto Imperatore, 28 (Via del Corso) Price: around 10€ 2. Salotto 42 (cc: zero.eu) Nestled in the perfect central location, Salotto 42 offers artisinal cocktails and a generous aperitivo buffet.  You can also sip you cocktail while enjoying the view of Hadrian's temple. Salotto 42 is also located close to the Pantheon, making it the perfect stop after our walking tour of Rome at night. Where: Piazza di Petra, 42 Price: around 10€ 3. Fluid (cc: fodors.com) This ultra-modern cocktail bar is one of the the best aperitivo bars in the city. Despite its, well, interesting decor Fluid is known for its extensive selection of liquors and cocktails.  In addition to their drink selection, Fluid has a huge aperitivo that features both Italian and international options.  It is also located just down the street from Piazza Navona - perfect for a post Ancient Tour aperitivo! Where: Via del Governo Vecchio, 46 Price: 10€ - 15€ 4. Freni e Frizione (cc: spottedbylocals.com) This trendy bar is located in one of Rome's trendiest neighbourhoods - Trastevere. With expert mixologists manning the bar, its no surprise that Freni e Frizione is one of the best places to go for a cocktail.  They also feature an aperitivo bar in the evenings with pizza, pastas, and salads as well as an outdoor terrace between Piazza Trilussa and the Tiber. Check out aperitivo at Frene and Frizione after our walking tour of Trastevere and the Jewish Ghetto. If you want to learn more about Trastevere, head over to our previous post where we explore the area and give you our highlights.  Where: Via del Politeama, 4/6 Price: around 10€ 5. Panella (cc: prontoroma.com) Although their cocktails may be a bit pricey, you don't want to miss out on Panella's aperitivo.  They offer a wide selection of gourmet breads, fried foods, bruschette, crostini, and more.  Located in the trendy Monti district, Panella is also the perfect place to go for a stroll and a bite to eat near the Colosseum. Where: Via Merulana, 54 Price: 15€-20€ Where is your favourite place to go for aperitivo in Rome? Let us know in the comments!
The Holy Year of Mercy and the Holy Doors of Rome
19 Nov 2016
What is Jubilee/the Holy Year?  (cc: giubileopapafrancesco.it) The practice of celebrating the Holy Year has ancient roots and can be traced back to the book of Leviticus in the Old Testament.  The year-long celebration normally occurs every 25 years and feature special events, pilgrimages, and sacraments centered around the forgiveness of God, but the Pope also has the ability to proclaim extraordinary Holy Year if he so chooses.  During each Jubilee, the Holy Doors are opened and those who pass through are said to be absolved of all previous sin. The first Holy Year or Jubilee occurred in 1300 after many - who had been experienced war and immense suffering - flocked to the tombs of St. Peter and St. Paul. Since then, there have been  27 Holy Years including 3 that were extraordinary.  Extraordinary Jubilees (such as this year) are not previously planned and are called on by the Pope in order to emphasize a particular theme or event.  For example, the last extraordinary Jubilee was held in 1983 under Pope John Paul II to mark the 1950th anniversary of Jesus' death. What is the Holy Year of Mercy?  - (cc: giubileopapafrancesco.it) Pope Francis declared that December 8th 2015 - November 20th 2016 would be the 27th Holy Year and that it would focus on the concept of mercy.  According to interviews given by the Pope, this was done is response to "the world's need for a revolution of tenderness".  In other words, the Pope aimed to highlight the suffering, marginalization, and poverty that has permeated society in recent years and connect the suffering with those dedicated to providing support.  The Pope declared the official theme of the 2015 Jubilee would be "Merciful Like the Father". Why are the Holy Doors Significant?  Holy Doors are significant in the Catholic church as they are only opened during Jubilee years.  Each Holy Door is an entrance to a major Papal basilica and they are normally sealed from the inside using brick or cement. As previously mentioned, during Holy Years people are able to walk through these doors and receive what is said to be absolute forgiveness for their past sins.   The most prominent Holy Door is located at St. Peter's Basilica, however there are 3 other Holy Doors located in Papal basilicas in Rome - St. John Laternan's, St. Mary Major's, and St. Paul's Outside the Walls. - There are also many other doors that have been given this status all over the world.  Check out this interactive map to see where they are located.  Jubilee 2016: The Holy Year of Mercy Pope Francis' Holy Year of Mercy will officially come to an end this Sunday when the Holy Doors at St. Peter's Basilica are closed and resealed.  The pontiff's Jubilee of Mercy including a variety of events that aimed to highlight "works of mercy" such as feeding the hungry, visiting the sick, sheltering the homeless, etc.  It is estimated that over 20 million people made the pilgrimage to Rome over the course of the year to walk through the Holy Doors and St. Peter's. It is also estimated that over 1 billion people participated in the Year of Mercy worldwide. Here are some of the highlights: (cc: yahoo.com/news) Pope Francis unofficially began this year's Jubilee by opening the Holy Doors at a cathedral in the Central Republic of Africa The Holy Year of Mercy officially commenced on the morning of December 8th, 2015 when the Pope opened the Holy Doors at St. Peter's Basilica. (cc: telegraph.co.uk) Fiat Lux: Illuminating Our Common Home also took place on December 8th and featured images of our "shared natural world" being projected onto St. Peter's.  The aim of the event was to inspire change regarding the current climate crisis across generations, cultures, languages, etc. (cc: telegraph.co.uk) The Holy Doors at St. John Lateran's were opened on December 13th, 2015. The doors at St. Mary Major followed on the 1st of January, as well as the doors at St. Paul's Outside the Walls on January 26th, 2017. (cc: dailymail.co.uk) Over the course of the Holy Year of Mercy, the Pope including various events dedicated to prisoners, the homeless, and disabled persons.  For example, closing events have including Pope Francis inviting prisoners and homeless persons into St. Peter's Basilica for Holy Mass. What was your favourite event of Jubilee 2016? Let us know in the comments!  The Holy Doors may be closing tomorrow morning, however you can still experience St. Peter's Basilica with Enjoy Rome.  Click here to book!                  
November 19th - 24th in Rome
17 Nov 2016
The month of November is flying by! Here are 5 things to add to your calendar this week: 1. Rome Jazz Festival  (cc: romajazzfestival.it) Rome's 40th jazz festival continues this week through the 23rd of November.  Performances this week include Fabrizio Consoli, Paola Ronci, Jacky Terrason Trio, and many more.  Head over to the festival's website for more details. More information: romajazzfestival.it 2. Life of Wine (cc: @mohawkvalleywinery) On Sunday November 20th, Rome will be hosting an interesting wine tasting opportunity.  Organized by Florence's Studio Umami, the event seeks to highlight the relationship between wine and time by featuring vintage selections.  The event includes over 60 wineries, guided tastings and panel discussions. When: November 20th, 11:30-19:30 Where: Hotel Radisson Blu Roma, Via Filippo Turati 171 Entrance: 20€ 3. Monti Unplugged: Emily Jane White  (cc: thisismyjam.com) On November 21st, Emily Jane White will be performing as part of the Monti Unplugged acoustic concert series! The California native will be playing at Blackmarket in one of Rome's coolest neighbourhoods. When: November 21st, 21:00 Where: Blackmarket, Via Panisperna 101 Entrance: Free 4. Arnoldo Foa Exhibit (cc: arnoldofoa.it) Rome's Teatro di Villa Torlonia is holding an interesting event dedicated to an Italian film icon.  Until December 30th, visitors have the chance to see a variety of photographs, film clips and personal items that showcase the life and career of Arnoldo Foa.  Foa is considered to be a staple in Italian film as he appeared in over 130 movies between 1938 and 2014. When: Until December 30th Where: Teatro di Villa Torlonia, Via Lazzaro Spallanzani 1A Entrance: Free 5. International Festival of Sacred Music and Art  (cc: linkedin.com) The International Festical of Sacred Music and Art will be in Rome until November 21st.  The festival features a variety of events that you don't want to miss including performances by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. When: Until November 21st More information: http://www.festivalmusicaeartesacra.net/en/programm.php
Explore With Us: Navona
16 Nov 2016
The city of Rome is made up of various neighbourhoods/districts that each have their own sentiments and atmospheres.  Twice a month, Enjoy Rome will be exploring these neighbourhoods and providing you with our tips to make the most out of your visit.  This week we are exploring the Navona neighbourhood; one of Rome’s most historic areas.  Book your spot on our guided tour of Ancient Rome to learn more! The area surrounding Piazza Navona is commonly referred to as the Navona neighbourhood, but it is technically part of the Parione district.  Parione is the 6th district (or rione) of Rome and refers to much of the historic centre.  The large neighbourhood was actually split into two sections when Corso Vittorio Emmanuele was constructed in the late 19th century - a northern section surrounding Piazza Navona and a southern section surrounding Campo de' Fiori.  If you want to read more about Campo de' Fiori, check out last week's Mercato Monday post.  You can also book your tour of Campo de' Fiori by clicking here. Here are our Navona highlights, as well as recommedations of what to see/do before or after your Ancient tour: TO SEE:  No visit to to this area is complete without going to the piazza that is at the heart of the district - Piazza Navona.  The piazza was actually built on top of Domitian's stadium from Ancient times! Although you can no longer visit the stadium itself, it is fascinating to imagine while standing amongst the Baroque palazzi, ornate fountains, and colourful street art that has come to define the square.  Piazza Navona is the final stop on our Ancient tour. At the centre of the square is one of Bernini's most famous masterpieces, the Fountain of Four Rivers, that is said to personify the four major rivers - Nile, Ganges, Danube, and Plate). Also located inside the square is Chiesa Sant'Agnese in Agone.  The baroque-style church was built in the 17th century on the site where Saint Agnes was said to be martyred. Just next to the church you will also find Palazzo Pamphilj.  The palace was built by Pope Innocent X, but today is houses the Brazilian embassy. Find interest in the supernatural? Piazza Navona is actually said to be haunted! Legend has it that the ghost of Costanza Conti de Cupis (a noblewoman from the 1600s) can be seen in the windows looking down on the piazza, but only when there is a full moon. Just outside Piazza Navona you can also find Museo di Roma - which was founded during the fascist era in order to preserve "old Rome".  Today, it is largely a museum of art that is part of Rome's network of civic museums. Not far from Piazza Navona you will find Piazza Pasquino.  The piazza itself has a lot to offer including a beautiful church and great restaurants.  However, the most interesting part of this small piazza is is the statue that is referred to as one of Rome's "talking statues".  The statues have been used for centuries as a means for political expression and anonymous civil disobediance. Even today you can see poetry and other forms of political commentary posted next to the statue. Chiesa Nuova (also known as Chiesa Santa Maria in Valicella) is located just a short walk from the Piazza along Corso Vittorio Emmanuele and features incredible frescos.  It was built in 1577 and also has an impressive library inside. TO WALK:  Via Governo Vecchio is one of the areas main streets.  Grab a gelato and  to admire the cobblestone streets, boutique shops, and renaissance era homes. Via Coronari and Via della Pace are also worth a stroll. TO SHOP: Piazza Navona has no shortage of places nearby to sharp, but the most noteworthy are the vintage and leather shops along Via Governo Vecchio. During the day (as well as sometimes at night)  you can also find a variety of artists and craft vendors in the actual piazza, as well as the surrounding area. TO EAT:  The Navona neighbourhood has a ton to offer in terms of restaurants and the winding streets are home to many authentic italian restaurants.  Cul de Sac in Piazza Pasquino offers a large selection of wine and locally curated meat/cheese plates.  Pizzeria Baffetto is the place to go for pizza and eating in this family-run establishment is an experience in and of itself.  On the other side of Piazza Navona you can also find The Old Bear, whose pasta menu changes daily to ensure the freshest ingrediants. TO DRINK:  In addition to everything else it has to offer, this neighbourhood is also known for its nightlife.  Whether inside the piazza itself or on one of the many sidestreets, there are a variety of places to get a quality cocktail and people-watch.  We recommend Bar del Fico; they have an artisanal cocktail menu, aperitivo and even live music.  Mimi & Coco and Il Piccolo offer the perfect people-watching locations. If you are looking for your sports fix, Via Governo Vecchio is also home to an Irish pub called The Abbey.  Want to learn more about this historic neighbourhood? Book your tour of Ancient Rome and experience it with a live guide! What's your favourite part about the Navona neighbourhood? Let us know in the comments!   
Mercato Mondays: Campo de' Fiori
14 Nov 2016
Situated in the heart of the historic centre, Campo de’Fiori is one of the most vibrant squares in Rome.  The name Campo de’ Fiori translates to “field of flowers” and dates back to the middle ages when the square was simply a meadow.  In the mid 15th century however, Pope Callixtus III decided to develop the area.  This led to the construction of numerous important structures such as Palazzo Corsini. As a result, Campo de’Fiori became a popular gathering place for the neighbourhood’s powerful.  Since then, Campo de’ Fiori has cultivated a rich and fascinating history – most recently, the piazza has become one of Rome’s most important markets.  Join us as we explore Mercato Campo de’ Fiori and share  some of our highlights with you. Where: Piazza Campo de’ Fiori When: Monday – Saturday, 7:00-14:00 (Note: during high tourist season the market also opens on Sundays) Want to learn more about the history of Campo de’Fiori? Book your spot on our Trastevere tour to experience Campo de’Fiori with a live guide!  The market in Campo de’ Fiori is one of the oldest open-air markets in Rome. Each morning, the piazza is transformed into a colourful local marketplace that is enjoyed by both residents and tourists. Despite the large number of tourists that flock here each day, the market has been able to retain many of its traditional characteristics – thus providing a window into everyday Roman life.   From fresh seasonal fruits/vegetables, to spices, to pastas, to kitchenware, to  even clothing – Campo de’ Fiori offers an incredible range of products in a quintessentially Roman setting. Here are some of our highlights: Just like the piazza's name would suggest, Campo de' Fiori is one of the many places in Rome where you can get fresh flowers. Here you can find a variety of indoor/outdoor plants, as well as seeds to plant yourself. One of the best things about Campo is the fresh fruit stands.  If you are looking for a healthy breakfast or snack on the go, look no further. Here vendors offer bowls of freshly chopped fruit, as well as fresh-squeezed fruit juices.   Seasonal produce is also in abundance in Campo de' Fiori.  Each vendor offers locally grown produce - some of which is even pre-chopped.  You know soup season has arrived when the Minestrone mix (pre-chopped vegetables for soup) is front and centre. The market also offers a variety of housewares - we recommend checking out the wide range of ceramics. Some vendors specialize in artisinal meats and cheeses. While others specialize in Italian leathers. Although it may not be part of the actual market, Forno Campo de' Fiori has become a staple in the piazza.  The bakery offers some of the best pizza bianca in the city! Ever wonder who the statue in the centre of the piazza is of? Head over the Halloween edition of Enjoy Rome's blog to read about Campo de' Fiori's dark past.  Click here to book your tour of Campo de' Fiori!
November 12th - 18th in Rome
12 Nov 2016
This week in Rome... 1. Saturdays at Capitoline Museum (cc: secretearth.com) From November 12th to December 3rd, visitors have the chance to experience the Capitoline Museum in an entirely different light.  The musem itself is one of the oldest in Rome dating back to the 15th century. Each Saturday, the museums will be open late from 20:00 to 23:00.  Each Saturday evening will feature different events including live music, theatrical performances, food, art displays and many more. When: November 12th, 19th, and 26th as well at December 3rd - 20:00 to 23:00 Where: Musei Capitolini - Piazza del Campidoglio, 1 Tickets:  only €1 2. This Week at Rome's Jazz Fest (cc: romajazzfestival.it) Rome's 40th Jazz Festival continues throughout the city this week.  Now that the festival is in full swing, there are an abundance of performances and events in the next week. Performances this week include Richard Galliano, Crazy Stompin' Club, John Scofield, and many more. Check out the festival's website for more details. More infomation: http://www.romajazzfestival.it/ 3. All Blacks Versus Italy ù (cc: federugby.it) New Zealand's All Blacks rugby teams returns to Rome this week.  The legendary team will face off against Italy at Stadio Olimpico this Saturday! When: November 12th - 15:00 Where: Stadio Olimpico - Viale dei Gladiatori Tickets:  Prices vary depending on where they are purchased 4. Reaction Roma Exhibit (cc: wantedinrome.com) This exhibit definetly provides visitors with an interesting perspective of Roman life.  Made from over 400 video entries, Reaction Roma captures life in the city through the lens of everyday Romans. The exhibit has been referred to as "photograph in motion" that depicts the "real Rome". When: November 11th to December 3rd - 14:30 to 19:30 Where: MACRO Testaccio - Piazza Orazio Giustiniani, 4 Tickets:  Free entry 5. Other Times, Other Myths Exhibit From now until January 8th, visitors have the chance to experience the 16th edition of Quadriennale d'Arte di Rome.  The exhibition celebrates contemporary Italian art and features 150 works by 100 artists including paintings, sculptures, and photography. In particular, this year's exhibition will focus on how Italian contemporary art has developed since 2000. When: Until January 8th - 10:00-20:00 daily, closed on Mondays Where: Palazzo delle Esposizioni - Via Nazionale, 194 Tickets:  8€-10€
National Unity and Armed Forces Day
04 Nov 2016
Wonder why there were jets flying over the centre this morning? Or why Piazza Venezia was closed to traffic? National Unity and Armed Forces Day On November 4th, Italy celebrates National Unity and Armed Forces Day - which commemorates the end of World War I on the Italian Front and soldiers lost in battle.  The day is also meant to pay respect to those actively serving in Italy's armed forces around the world. On November 3rd 1918, Italian and Austrian-Hungarian forces agreed to and signed an armstice agreement at Villa Giusti in Padova, Italy.  On November 4th, 1918 the ceasefire between Italian and Austrian-Hungarian forces took effect - ending the First World War on the Italian Front and contributing to the conclusion of the war shortly there after. (cc:difesa.it) The ceasefire was the result of the Battle of Vittorio Veneto in northern Italy where Italian forces defeated Austrian-Hungarian forces.  Some Italians see this victory as the cumination of the Risorgimento Nationalist Movement that unified the country in the 19th century. (cc:difesa.it) National Unity and Armed Forces Day at Altare della Patria in Rome Each year, Rome commemorates National Unity and Armed Forces Day with a ceremony at Altare della Patria. During the ceremony more than 1000 service members participate in the military parade. The ceremony also features the President of Italy placing a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. There is a fly-over by the Italian Air Force's aerial acrobatics team Frecce Tricolori. (cc:difess.it)
November 4th - 11th in Rome
03 Nov 2016
1. Roma Jazz Festival (cc: romajazzfestival.it) From November 6th to the 23rd, Rome will be holding its 40th annual jazz festival! The festival includes various events and performances to be enjoyed by the public.  This week You can see Radical Gypsy at Casa del Jazz (November 6th), Joshua Redman/Brad Mehldau Duo at Sinopoli Hall (November 8th), and Jacob Collier at Petrassi Hall (November 9th). Where: Locations vary, please visit website When: November 6th to 23rd, specific times vary Tickets: Also varies based on performance 2. Exhibit: Star Wars: Play (cc: ilvittoriano.com) Until January 29th, visitors have the opportunity to experience the cinematographic history of the Star Wars francise right here in Rome.  The exhibit includes over 1000 items including scale models, toys, costumes, vintage prints and many more. Experience another level of the universe that has captivated audiences for decades. Where: Complesse del Vittoriano ala Brasini, Via San Pietro in Carcere When: Until January 29th - Monday to Thursday 9:30-19:30, Friday and Saturday 9:30 to 22:00, and Sundays 9:30-20:30 Tickets: 8€ - 10€ 3. Cinema2Day (cc: @cinema2day) Thanks to the Italian Culture Ministry, it will only cost 2€ to see a movie next Wednesday! The nationwide initiative hopes to encourage culture through the cinema and applies to over 3000 movie theatres nationwide. The initiative will also continue through the second week of February, offering 2€ movies on the second Wednesday of each month. Where: Locations vary, please go to the Cinema2Day website for more details When: November 9th Tickets: 2€ 4. Exhibit: Art and Politics (cc: museomacro.org) "Arte e Politica" is MACRO's newest exhibition exploring differenct political and social themes.  From 1930s paintings reflecting sentiments surrounding Fascism to more recent social/political attitudes and issues, this exhibit is both thought-provoking and fascinating.  The exhibit includes works by Mario Mafai, Claudio Abate, Ines Fontenla, and many more. Where: MACRO, Via Nizza 138 When: Until May 10th - Tuesday to Sunday 10:30-19:30 Tickets: 9€-11€ 5. MAXXI Raises Funds to Help With Earthquake Aftermath  (cc: @valentina_pascale) Following a series of earthquakes in central Italy, the MAXXI Museum of 21st Century Art has decided to raise funds to help restore historic buildings, churches and other aspects of Italian cultural heritage that were damaged.  On Saturday November 5th, all proceeds from ticket sales at MAXXI will go directly towards these efforts.  This is a great opportunity to experience one of Rome's best museums while also giving back to the community! Where: MAXXI, Via Guido Reni 4 When: Saturday November 5th - 11:00-22:00 Tickets: 8€-12€ What are your favourite events in Rome this week? Let us know on Facebook!  Visit our website to book one of our many guided tours of Rome! 
Explore With Us: Trastevere
02 Nov 2016
The city of Rome is made up of various neighbourhoods/districts that each have their own sentiments and atmospheres.  Twice a month, Enjoy Rome will be exploring these neighbourhoods and providing you with our tips to make the most out of your visit.  This week we are wandering through the charming streets of Trastevere, one of Rome's most interesting districts.  Book your spot on our guided tour of Trastevere and the Jewish Ghetto to learn more! The Trastevere neighbourhood, the 13th district of Rome, is an off-the-beaten-path gem that is rich in history and culture.   Trastevere (which means "across the river") is a unique district filled with winding cobblestone streets, greenery and even graffiti.  You can find this charming area on the West side of the Tiber River via Ponte Sisto, just a short walk from the busy city centre. The origins of Trastevere can be traced to Ancient Rome when it was mostly inhabited by sailors, fishermen, and slaves. It also became home to the city's first Jewish community before the Ghetto was established in the 1500s. Fast forward to the 1970s, the culture of Trastevere is comparable to the 1960s counter-culture in San Francisco - attracting writers, acitivists, and musicians en masse. It is clear that Trastevere was considered to be on the periphery for centuries, however it is this position that allowed it to develop the unique personality that is tanglible in the district today. Here are our Trastevere highlights, as well as recommendations of what to see/do before or after your tour: TO SEE... Although Piazza Trilussa is located at the edge of the district, it remains one of Trastevere's main squares.  Here you will find both locals and tourists sitting on the steps of the fountain, enjoying a beer and listening to live music. On the weekend, Trilussa becomes a hotspot for Rome's youth before they head to one of Trastevere's many bars. Porta Settimiana is an ancient gate in Rome's Aurelian walls.  In Trastevere, you can sip a cappuccino at the nearby cafe while observing this piece of antiquity. (cc: maremagnum.com) Head to Trastevere's main square - Piazza Santa Maria - to see Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere.  The piazza itself is often bustling with visitors and street artists including musicians, performers, etc.  You will also find it is a common past-time to sit and people watch on the steps of the fountain.  The Basilica itself dates back to the 4th century and includes incredible 12th century mosaics.  Experience Basilica di Santa Maria in detail on our guided tour of Trastevere and the Jewish Ghetto!  Basilica di Santa Cecilia (the patroness of music) is also located in the Trastevere district. The church itself was built in the 9th century and is said to have been constructed on the site where St. Cecilia's home once stood. Inside you will find one of Cavalini's most famous frescoes, as well as Stefano Maderno's sculpture of St. Cecilia. The church was built during the reign of Pope Paschal I who also had St. Cecilia's remains moved there from the San Callisto Catacombs. Book your tour of the San Callisto Catacombs to see St. Cecilia's orginial resting place. You can also find Palazzo Corsini in the Trastevere district - an 18th century boroque palace built by the prominent Corsini family. The palace now holds the National Gallery of Antique Art. Also worth mentioning is Piazza San Cosimato.  Each Sunday morning, the Piazza holds Trastevere's only open-air market. TO WALK... As previously mentioned, Trastevere has some of the most charming streets in the city. Many of the district's cobblestone streets are lush with greenery and romantically lit at night.  Enjoy Rome recommends Via del Moro and Via dei Genovesi. Just above Trastevere is Gianicolo Hill where you can find some of the best views of the Eternal city.  It is about a 20 minute walk up-hill, but so worth it. TO SHOP... One of the best things about Trastevere is that it has some of the most interesting shopping in the city. Here you will find a variety of flagship/concept stores and studios with an ecclectic selection of items.  It's a "you won't find this anywhere else" kinda place. We recommend the Almost Corner Bookstore for a wide selection of international literature and Polvere di Tempo for a magical mix of globes, clocks, etc.  Also be sure to stop into Ferrara for artisanal italian food products. TO EAT... Trastevere has emerged as one of Rome's most prominent foodie neighbourhoods.  Whether it is traditional italian dishes, international cuisine, or street food, Trastevere has it all.  We recommend Dar Poeta - a quaint family-run pizzeria tucked away on a quiet street.  La Renella is the place to go for pizza al taglio (Roman pizza by the slice), fresh breads, and baked desserts.  Additionally, Checco has built a reputation for having some of the best Roman cuisine in the district.  If you are looking to satisy a gelato craving Fior di Luna's selection of fruit flavours are some of the best. TO DRINK... Trastevere is central to Rome's nightlife.  On the weekends (as well as many weekdays) you will find the streets street buzzing with local youth and international students.  As a result, the neighbourhood has cultivated an interesting variety of cocktail bars.  We recommend Freni & Frizioni if you are looking to mingle with the locals and Santo if you are looking to try top notch mixology. Bir and Fud also offers a wide selection of Italian brewed beers. Want to see more? Book your tour of Trastevere with Enjoy Rome! 
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